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about 2017-06-25T14:49:46+00:00

who I am

My name is Fabian Rosenkranz. I work as a freelancing animator and illustrator in Berlin, Germany. I started freelancing in 1997 and have been self employed ever since. I love character related work and most of the jobs I have been hired for over the last years have been character or cloth related. However, during my career I have touched almost any area of 3d work, including modelling, sculpting, architecture and product visualization, rendering, technical rigging, script and plug-in development, motion graphics and simulations.

My background is more artistic than technical. As a young adult I wanted to draw comics. I started to work with the Computer rather late and initially without much enthusiasm. So it surprised me as much as anybody else to discover that I not only enjoyed 3d, but also writing code.

By shifting the focus of my 3d work more and more towards character animation, I have come very close to what I dreamed of as a young man: telling a story with images.

what I do for money

Here’s a list of the things I’m usually hired for. Don’t hesitate to contact me to find out if I’m currently available for work.

  • character animation

  • character rigging, facial rigging

  • cloth simulations, cloth modeling

  • any other type of 3d animation

  • 3d training

  • plug-ins & scripts

  • modelling & sculpting

  • UV layout & texturing

  • particle and dynamic setups

  • lighting & rendering

a few words about the software I use

Cinema 4d

Cinema 4d is the 3d software I use since version 4. That is forever in software terms. I wrote articles about it, wrote parts of the documentation, gave training to groups and individuals in Germany, Switzerland and Singapore. I have been a beta tester for more then 12 years and learned to write plug-ins and scripts in COFFEE and Python. For many years I stubbornly tried to use it for every project from start to finish and often I succeeded. It is very stable and reliable and has a pretty complete set of tools. However, in recent years I became a little frustrated with its character tools and its timeline and animation work flow. So while I still like and use Cinema a lot, I started to look at other packages as well.

Blender

I started to use Blender in 2013 and I was amazed by its tool set and the development. It is not only cool for a free piece of software, it is cool, period! The more I learned, the more I realized how well it works in many areas, for example character tools, animation, modelling, sculpting, re-topology, UV unwrapping and texture painting.

Open source software has a big advantage besides being free. Typically it takes a lot of time to learn a software package well enough to use it in a professional environment. That is the big investment, much bigger than the actual money you pay for the package. So from the professionals point of  view the fact that a software package is free isn’t as big a deal as it is for a student or a hobbyist. The real advantage is that there’s no PR department deciding where to go with the software on the basis of what’s selling best. There’s no company owning and maybe selling the package, leaving you stranded in an dead end with all your precious knowledge and experience. This means learning open source software is a safe investment.

Other interesting open source projects: Krita (a very cool painting program), Gimp (image editor), Inkscape (vector graphics) and Natron (compositing).

Marvelous Designer

Marvelous Designer is a very specialized piece of software. It only allows you to build and simulate cloth, but it does that very well. I started to play around with it a few years ago, found a way to use it with Cinema 4d, did some tests with MoCap and made a tutorial on Vimeo. To my surprise that had a rather huge impact and people started to hire me for cloth simulations. So I did quite a lot of cloth related jobs recently and kept learning Marvelous Designer. And while it lacks control when doing more abstract stuff – compared to other great cloth tools as Maya’s NCloth or Houdini – it is a joy to work with when dressing 3d characters. Also the dynamic way it generates geometry as well as the great export options make it a valuable tool.

Maya

Last year I started learning Maya mainly because I want to become more serious with character animation. And while other tools like Blender offer a good animation work-flow, Maya still is the benchmark and industry standard for character animation. Learning Maya really helps me to understand why certain tools work the way they do.

While still focusing on the character tools, I realized that there are other areas in Maya I do like a lot, for example the integrated n-solver and the new viewport 2.0.

ZBrush

Zbrush is another highly specialized 3d tool. It is the industry standard for sculpting for many years now and recently became very interesting for modeling and retopology as well. ZBrush has a unique interface that needs some getting used to, but once you grasped the basic concepts, it is a lot of fun to use. I’m still far away from being a master sculptor, but I enjoy using ZBrush both professionally and privately.

V-Ray

V-Ray is a render engine that is very robust and reliable and offers great quality and good speed. It is available for all mayor packages. I use the Cinema 4d version which is unfortunately always a little behind since the Cinema bridge it is not a direct Chaosgoup product. The setup isn’t always easy but the results are gorgeous and it is also supported by most render farms.

Octane

Octane Render

Octane is a very nice gpu renderer. It uses CUDA compatible graphic cards for rendering. You get a useful preview almost instantly. Rendering can be very, very fast, depending on your scene. The setup is easy and results are simply beautiful. It is very close to being my favorite renderer. The only draw back currently is that I haven’t yet found a good render farm that supports Octane.